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James Patton 1692

 

Source: ID: 1156
Ancestors of Robert Palmer Rhoads (decsendents)
Source: ID: 1483
Ancesrots of Robert Palmer Rhoads.
(Reasearch): Born in 16920in Newton, Limavaddy, not slated ot inhearit any of the Patton estates, so he went to sea when very young. The Book goes on to say "A very impressive ship's master he must have been, as he was a 'man of gigantic statue, handsome and dignified and of remarkably commanding powers'. He was dark-haired and brown-eyed and over sis feet two inches tall." it is said that James took part in theWar with France called "Queen Anne's War" which terminated in 1713.
In the 'James Patton' book p 21 is a mention of Samuel Patton, as follows:
"The suggestion has been made that James Patton was responsible for the importation of the first Arabian horses into the English colonies in North Ameica. An Arabianstallion named Bulle Rocke was imported into Virginia about 1730. One Samuel Patton had the first cetificate for Bulle Rocke.
It is thought that Samuel was a brother of James Patton already established in Virginia and Captian Patton, the ship;s master, brought him Bull Roche on one of his Trans-Atlantic voyges."
The following is from "The Family Tree" by Mary Preston Gray
Henry Patton was a ship builder and ship owner, operating merchant ships. His son James was in the royslnavy and held in high esteem by the King. Sometine after leaving the navy, James married Mary Borden (some accounts say Mary Osborne and others Burden) and had two daughters, Mary Patton B. 1728 and Margaret Patton. James was Captian of a ship called the "Warpole", one of Henry Patton's sips. Not sure if it was a merchant ship or passenger but I would guess a merchant ship. It is said that James made as many as 20 or 25 passages fromNorthern Ireland to America, specifically, Hobbe's Hole, Virginia on the Rappahannack Ruver. He carried Ulster Immigrants to Virginia and returned with peltries and tobacco. In about 1738, James Patton received a grant of120,000 acres of land in America. The King's only sipulation was that the land should be west of the 'Blue Mountains', and that settlements should be established for worthy and dependable British subjects. James Patton made one last voyage along with Alexander Breckinridge and his wife Jane (according to MPG, sister of John Preston), there were McCues, McClungs, McPheeters and many other Scottish names. Counties Donegal, Derry andAntrim nad given refuge to the Protestant Scots who fled from Roman Catholic persecution and these descendentsof those Presbyterian Scotchmen were ready to brave the dangers of the new world to found for themselves a home of religous freedon. James Paton brought his wife andtwo daughters, John Preston and his wife Elizabeth Patton Preston, their three daughters, Letitia, Margaret, and Mary and their one son, William Preston (founder of the Smithfield Preston). Johns fourth daughter, Ann or Elizabeth Ann Preston was apparently born in this country in 1739. Others were John Buchanan and his two sisters Margaret and Martha, John Preston's sister , Mary Preston who later married Phillip Barger. The Walpole arrived in Belhaven, near Alexandria on the Potomac on August 26, 1736. There were supposedly 56 passengers aboard the Walpole on this trip and it is believed 30 of them were imported to settle a 30,000 acre tract, 1000 acres each. Patton, Lewis (a relative and land speculator) and William Beverley had entered a joint venture to obtain land from thr Councle of Virginia. The Pattons and Prestons settled adjacent to Tinkling Spring in the southern part of Beverley Manor (near what it now Staunton). See how the Beverley Manor was divided. They were among those who in the fall of the same year formed the Triple Forks of the Shenando Congregation, which later became the Tinkling Spring Meeting House Congreation. These These Presbyterians were considered "dissentors", that is theydissented from the Anglican Church of England. (See also a page on James Patton which shows family connections better. John Preston is burried at Tinkling Spring Church neae Staunton, VA. See Pictures of the Church and its history.) Patton later built on the upper waters of the James River two villages and two forts. One was called Pttonsburg and the other, Buchanan. These two villages remain still, Patttonsburg is very small but Buchanan hasgrown into a thriving town.

He also took large numbers of acres in Botetourt County, VA. His own home he names "Spring Farm", which is now within the corporate limits of Staunton, VA. Theother place was called ,"Spring Hill" and was recently by a Mr. Leonard Hunter, near Waynesboro, Virginia. Young John Buchanan soon married Patton's oldest daughter, Margaret, and they lived for years at Buchanan's Fort. Martha Buchanan, John's oldest sister, married a cousin newly arrived in the colony, another John Buchanan. John's youngest sister Margaret Buchanan, married Major Charles Campbell. they became parents of General William Campbell, the hero of the Battle of Kings Mountain.

James Patton took up several thousand acres on the New River, in what is now Montgomery County, Virginia. Here, on the river, Phillip and Mary (Preston) Barger built a fort and began a settlement. To this day it is known as the "Barger's Fort, and across the ridge Patton built a fort and began a settlement known as "Draper's Meadows". Here the Drapers, Ingles, McDonalds, Cloyds, ect. made their first home in the new New World. Pattons home was called "Solitude" and it was here, on July 8, 1755, Col. James Patton met a tragic death when much of the settlement was wiped out on a bright Sunday morning by the savage Tomahawk. It is said that Patton had sent his nephew William Preston on an errand to Sinking Spring (near present day Newport). William had left early that morning. Draper Meadows is now known as Blacksburg, the home of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Currently the largest (and best) college in the state of Virginia. Four generations of Pattons lived here (at what is now known as "Solitude") as well as Governor John Floyd.
William Preston's home "Smithfield" is also located nearby. Mary Preston, grand-daughter of John and Elizabeth Patton Preston wa born here and married Capt.John Lewis of Sweet Springs. This John Lewis is descended from the Lewis family mentioned above.
This is only part of Mary Preston Gray's narrative and obviously only a small parat of the book "James Patton and the Appalachian Colonists". Some additiona comments and details have been added from work compiled by G. Mallory Boush.
Taken from"
Colonerl James Patton Chapter of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution:
James Patton, a Scotch-Irish sea captian, settled near Waynesboro in 1738 and was instrumental in the developement of Augusta County. He was the first sheriff and tax collector, and Colonel of all militia. He was an elected leader of the Tinkling Spring Presbyterian Church and of the Augusta Parish Vestry. He was an owner of vast tracts of land in western Virginia on which he established settlements of Scotch-Irish immigrants. Colonel Patton was a representative of Virginia at the Treaties of Lancaster and of Logstown with the Iroquis Indians. He was also a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses. During the French and Indian War uprisings, hewas killed by Indians at Draper's Meadow in 1755.



Source:
Taken from the file of Descendants of William M. A. Patton posted on http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Park/1479/patton.html
Death Date July 8, 1755 Blackburg, VA.

Source:
Ball and Autrey Ancestry

The Roseberry-Keister Family Tree
ID: I5739
Reference Number: 5739
Title: Col. 1 2
Name: James Patton 1 2
Sex: M
Change Date: 19 SEP 2000
WILL: 01 SEP 1750 Augusta Co., VA
Note:
CHRONICLES OF THE Scotch-Irish Settlement IN VIRGINIA EXTRACTED FROM THE ORIGINAL COURT RECORDS OF AUGUSTA COUNTY 1745-1800
ABSTRACTS OF WILLS OF AUGUSTA COUNTY, VIRGINIA. AUGUSTA COUNTY COURT. WILL BOOK NO. 2.
ADDITIONAL MEMBERS OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.
page 41
Page 131.--1st September, 1750. James Patton's will--Daughter, Mary, wife to William Thompson, 1 negro woman; tract called Spring Hill; 3,000 acres on which Saml. Stalnaker and others is living, known by name of Indian Fields,
on waters of Houlston's river, a branch of the Missisipio. Grandson, James Thompson, infant, remainder in above in fee tail. Daughter, Margaret, now wife of Col. John Buchanan. To son-in-law, William Thompson, the tract called
Springfield, joining where widow Gouldman now lives and on which Henry Patton lives. William is to keep the estate intact for his son, James, until 1772. To Margaret. tract called Cherry tree bottom, near Robert Looney's tract
at mouth of Purgatory, tract on which there is a small stone house. Margaret's daughter, Mary; sister, Preston, and her son, William Preston, 10 to be paid to Rev. John Craig, pastor at Tinkling Spring, to pay his stipends
from 1740 to 1750, to be paid by the congregation out of the money advanced by him to help build the meeting house. 10 of same to be laid out for a pulpit and pulpit cloth. John Preston's bond to be given up to his son, Wm.
Preston. All debts due by George Wilson, who is married to testator's wife's niece, Rebecca Vicers (Viers?), to be given up. Granddaughter, Mary Buchanan. Executors, John Buchanan, Wm. Thompson, nephew, Wm. Preston, Silas
Harte. All disputes between executors to be left to arbitration of the minister and elders of Tinkling Spring church. Testator was agent for John Smith, Zachery Lewis, Wm. Waller, Wm. Green, Wm. Parks for the Roanoke and James
River grants. As to the Great Grant on the waters of Misicipia, James Gordon, James Johnston, John Grimes, John ----, Richard Barns, Robert Gilchrist, James Bowre, Robert Jackson. have assigned their parts to testator. Richard
Winston's part is assigned to little John Buchanan. To Mary Preston, horses. Teste: Thomas Stewart, Edward Hall, John Williams. Proved, 26th November, 1755, by Stewart and Hall. Wm. Preston refuses to execute, also Silas Harte.
Buchanan and Thompson qualify, with sureties David Stewart, Joseph Culton, Wm. Preston, Edward Hall, Thomas Stewart. 16th August, 1769, Wm. Preston qualifies executor. [p.41]
3
Immigration: ABT 1730
Note: From Ireland to America with brother John Patton and sister Elizabeth 4 5
Event: Milit-Beg 27 MAY 1742 Augusta Co., VA
Note: Lt. Col. then Col. of militia (in May); appt. co. lt. in 1754 6 7
Event: Position BETWEEN 1752 AND 1755 VA
Note: Burgess 6
Birth: 08 JUL 1692 in Newton Limavady, Limavady, Londonderry, Ireland 8 9
Death: 30 JUL 1755 in Draper's Meadow,, Augusta Co., VA
Note: Killed by Shawnee Indians at Draper's Meadow. This was the massacre in which Mary Draper Ingles and two children were taken captive. 6 10
Event: 1744
Note: Signed the Treaty of Lancaster, one of the most important treaties ever negotiated between the Iroquois and the British colonies 11
Note: 12
From "James Patton and The Appalachian Colonists", by Patricia Givens Johnson:
James Patton was born in 1692 in Newton, Limavaddy, Derry Co., Ireland. He married Mary Borden (Mrs. Osborn). James, being a younger son, wasn't scheduled to inherit anything so he went to sea in the Royal Navy. He became a
ships captain and was held in high esteem by the King. His father, Henry, was a ship builder and/or merchant fleet owner and operator. The King granted James Patton 120,000 acres of land with the only stipulation that it be
located on the west side of the Blue Mountains and that it be settled by loyal British subjects. James sailed in one of his father's ships, the "Walpole." This ship is said to have made 20 or more passages to the states. He
carried Ulster immigrants to America and returned with furs, skins and tobacco. In one of the passages in 1738, James and his wife Mary, and his two daughters, Margaret and Mary, along with John Preston, his wife Elizabeth
Patton Preston, their children Letitia, about 10 years old, Margaret, about 8, William, about 7, and Mary Preston, about 6, along with John Preston's sister, Mary Preston, who later married Phillip Barger, and supposedly
another of John's sisters, Jane Preston Breckinridge and her husband, Alexander Breckinridge, arrived in Belhaven, near Alexandria on the Potomac on August 26, 1738. One of James Patton's settlements was known as "Drapers
Meadows," located at the present site of Blacksburg, Virginia. One sunny Sunday morning on July 8, 1755, Indians wiped out much of the settlement including James Patton. James and his wife Mary Borden had two daughters and no
sons. He adopted (officially or unofficially?) William Preston, son of John Preston. Margaret "Peggy" Patton married John Buchanan. John's sister, Martha Buchanan married a cousin newly arrived in America, another John
Buchanan. His other sister, Margaret Buchanan, married Maj. Charles Campbell, parents of Gen. William Campbell. Mary "Molly" patton (1728-1778) married capt. William Thompson. They had 10 Children.

James served in the Navy in Queen Anne's War. After the Treaty of Utrecht, he procured a passenger ship and traded to the Colony of Virginia at Robbs Hole on the Tappahannock. He penetrated the then wilderness of the state as
far as Orange County, thence across the Blue Ridge and commenced a settlement near Waynesborough in Augusta County. He crossed the Atlantic 23 or 25 times as Master of a ship in and around 1728. In his private shipping
enterprises, Capt. James Patton made contracts with promotors of the settlement of the western part of Virginia. He sailed on the ship Walpole to Virginia, arriving August 26, 1738. His first residence was Beverly Manor on
the south fork of the Shenendoah. From his headquarters there, Adventurer Patton soon extended his interest to the management of the Roanoke & James River Grant of 1740 and the Woods River Grant of 1745.

After the organization of Augusta County, Patton became county lieutenant, justice, sheriff, burgess and general leader in county affairs. He was an alert, energetic businessman imbued with a definite purpose and equipped with
enough education and intellect to be a successful community leader.

While tending to affairs of the community, Colonel James Patton was killed by Indians in July 1755 at Drapers Meadow.

From "Early Adventures On the Wesstern Waters" by Mary B. Kegley and F. B.Kegley:

James Patton Sees An Opening.
It would be interesting to know how much James Patton and his brother-in-law, John Preston, knew about opportunities for the acquisition of land in the region of western Virginia before they decided to leave Ireland and take
their chances on the Virginia frontier. An historian of the Patton family has said that the Pattons were an outstanding family of Scottish origin, a number of members of which in different generations served with distinction
in the Royal Navy, in the British Army, and in civil offices. The progenitor of the family in Ireland was William Patton, rector of several parishes in County Donegal. The father of James Patton was Henry Patton, a grandson
of William. His mother was Sarah Lynn of a prominent English family seated in Donegal County, Ulster, Ireland. James, the fourth son of Henry and Sarah, was born in 1692 and married a Ms. Osborne; a sister, Elizabeth, married
John Preston, a ship's carpenter. James served in the Navy, taking part in Queen Anne's War. He appears to have crossed the Atlantic as master of a ship only once in 1738 (Wilson, Tinkling Spring, p. 22). About this time
economic opportunities in Scotland and Ireland were not encouraging, so many Scotch-Irish families were looking toward America for a better field to cultivate. The Pattons and the Prestons became a part of this gret exodus of
the 1730's and 1740's. The Patton home place in Ireland was the Manor of Springfield, Barony of Kilmacrenan, County of Donegal, Province of Ulster. Later in Virginia the names Springfield and Kilmacrenan remained associated
with the family.

In his private shipping enterprises, Captain Jame Patton had made some contacts with the promoters of the settlement of the western part of Virginia. There is no record that he made frequent trips to the coastal towns carrying
indentured servants to Virginia shores, but as early as 1737 he had some acquaintance with William Beverley and considered joining in the acquisition of a grant to be located on the Calfpasture River. With these arrangements
completed, the ship Walpole, owned by Walter Lutwidge, was chartered to bring the Patton and Preston families with fifty-six others, including personal and indentured servants, sixty-five in all, to Virginia. They arrived at
Hobb's Hole (Tappahannock) August 26, 1738. Once here the first land Patton owned was in the Calfpasture grant; but his and Preston's first residences were in Beverley Manor on the south fork of the Shenandoah. From his
headquarters there, Adventurer Patton soon extended his interest to the management of the Roanoke and James River grant of 1740, and the Wood's River grant of 1745.

Since John Preston had not been a landowner in Ireland, he was willing to take chances with his brother-in-law in at least acquiring a homestead in the New World. In proving his importation into the colony of Virginia, he said
that he had come to America at his own charge "in order to partake of his Majesty's bounty for taking up land." He made this declaration in 1746 and died in 1747. He was satisfied with only a few tracts of land for which
titles were later made to his son, William. His home was on Lewis Creek near Beverley's Mill Place. The family consisted of his wife, Elizabeth, his son, William, and his daughters, Mary, Lettice, Margaret, and Ann.

James Patton was more ambitious. He had in mind acquiring as much as 30,000 acres in his own name. In the first surveys made for him in 1738, he was designated as captain. Following the settlement of Borden's grant, a number
of tracts were entered in the Forks of the James and on the Catawba, a south branch of the James some distance away. These scattered settlements were made prior to 1740 when the Virginia Council granted permission to John
Smith, Zachary Lewis, and others for surveys totalling 100,000 acres (with no specific boundaries) on "River and Branches of the Roanoke and the Branches of the James River" (Virginia Executive Journals, V, 173). As a result
of purchasing shares of all partners (except John Smith and Zachary Lewis), James Patton became the controlling agent of this company, all patents issuing in his name and all land being transferred by him by deed to the people
who bought the land.

The surveys and plats for the first grants in this territory were not preserved in the Orange County records and no trace of them has been found in the Secretary's office. However, it is from the Augusta County surveys, deeds,
and grants that the account of the early western settlement can be carried forward. For further details, see Kegley's Virginia Frontier, pp. 60-62.

After the organization of Augusta County, Patton became county lieutenant, justice, sheriff, burgess, and general leader in county affairs. He was an alert, energetic businessman imbued with a definite purpose and equipped
with enough education and intellect to be a successful community leader. His first interest was to secure the land he wanted; his first action was to select choice tracts while they were still available. The terms of the
Wood's River grant allowed him the privilege he wanted -- to select small or large tracts, in any shape, anywhere in the region covered. His scheme was a good example of competitive private enterprise, and although there were
groups of family relatives settling in contiguous valleys, there was no suggestion of a socialistic colony.

It was unfortunate that western Virginians lost their first prominent early adventurer soon after the beginning of the settlement. While tending to affairs of the community, Colonel James Patton was killed by the Indians in
July 1755 at Draper's Meadow. For further details of his life, see Johnson, James Patton and the Appalachian Colonists.

"Memoirs of Mrs. Letitia Floyds": James Patton was bred to the sea and in the wars of England with the low countries served as an officer in the royal navy. After the treaty of Utrecht he procured a passanger ship and traded
to the Colony of Virginia at Robbs Hole, on the Tappahannock. He penetrated the then wilderness of the state as far as Orange Co., thence across the Blud Ridge and commenced a settlement there near Waynesborough in Augusta
County.



Father: Henry Patton b: 1660 in Caiggo, Dundee, Scotland
Mother: Sarah Lynn b: 1664 in Kilmacrenan, Scotland

Marriage 1 Mary Borden b: 1696 in Whitehaven, Cumberland Co.,, England
Married: ABT 1720 6
Children
Margaret Patton b: ABT 1725 in Lumwaddy, Ireland
Mary Patton b: 1728 in Augusta County, Virginia

Sources:
Title: Marriages of some Virginia Residents 1607-1800
Abbrev: Marriages of VA Residents, Vol 2
Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, MD, 1995
Page: p. 169
Title: James Patton and the Appalachian Colonists
Abbrev: Patton and Colonists
Author: Johnson, Patricia Givens
Publication: Edmonds Printing Inc., Pulaski, VA, 1983
Page: p. 3
Title: Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia (Records of Augusta County, Virginia, 1745-1800 (three volumes)
Abbrev: Scotch-Irish in VA
Publication: Baltimore, MD, 1912
Page: p. 41
Title: The Compendium of American Geneaolgy, 1600s-1800s
Abbrev: Compendium American Genealogy
Author: Virkus
Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, Baltimore, 1997
Page: v. 5; p. 164. Lists c. 1740
Title: Coming to America: A Chronicle of the American Lineage of the Pattons
Abbrev: Coming to Americal
Author: Patton, C. L.
Publication: Springfield, IL, 1954
Page: quoted from within World Family Tree, Vol. 27, Tree #2183
Title: The Compendium of American Geneaolgy, 1600s-1800s
Abbrev: Compendium American Genealogy
Author: Virkus
Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, Baltimore, 1997
Page: v. 5; p. 583
Title: Virginia Vital Records #1, 1600s-1800s
Abbrev: VA Vital Records #1, 16-1800s
Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1997
Page: Militia Companies in Augusta Co., 1742, pp. 23, 24
Title: The Compendium of American Geneaolgy, 1600s-1800s
Abbrev: Compendium American Genealogy
Author: Virkus
Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, Baltimore, 1997
Page: v. 5; p. 583 Lists 1689
Title: James Patton and the Appalachian Colonists
Abbrev: Patton and Colonists
Author: Johnson, Patricia Givens
Publication: Edmonds Printing Inc., Pulaski, VA, 1983
Page: p. 5
Title: Early Adventurers On The Western Waters, Vol. I
Abbrev: Early Adventurers, I
Author: Mary B. & F. B. Kegley
Publication: Green Publishers, Inc., Orange, VA, 1980
Note:
History of SW Virginia's earliest settlers that has family sketches and numerous SW Virginia county records.
Page: p. 55
Title: James Patton and the Appalachian Colonists
Abbrev: Patton and Colonists
Author: Johnson, Patricia Givens
Publication: Edmonds Printing Inc., Pulaski, VA, 1983
Page: p. 4
Title: World Family Tree Research, Vol. 1-27
Abbrev: World Family Tree
Publication: Broderbund Software, Inc.